Gerber Onesies: Mustache, Aviators, Succulents and Chanel

Idea:

I’m visiting my friend Dina and 1 month old Sofie today! Insert swoon face emoji here. My mom always said never visit someone’s home empty handed. Though my mom has never said it, I know she prefers to give a practical gift that will be used and abused over a pretty something. Each passing year has shown that I am my mother’s daughter. I’ve been told by many mommies that their babies lived in their Onesies for a good part of their first few months. I couldn’t find a Onesies with the design and price I liked enough to give to the minimalist Dina so I assigned myself project.

Inspiration:

Last year I hand-printed shirts for Dina’s Bachelorette Party. Using the same ink and technique, I designed prints that were close to my heart and quick to produce (I only came up with the idea late eyesterday evening).

Ingredients:

  1. Tulip Soft Metallic Fabric Paint – Gold
  2. Freezer Paper
  3. Silhouette SD
  4. Iron
  5. Cardboard /  Something to line the back incase the fabric paint bleeds

Instructions:

  1. Prepare your design in Silhouette Studio.  Keep in mind the negative cuttings space will be used as the stencil.  Leave an 1″ + border of blank space around your design.  This will help avoid accidentally bleeding the paint to the outside of the design while painting.  I recommend that grouping of cuts be kept to a minimum.  For this project I grouped the mustache with the succulent and the chanel with the aviator sunglasses.  Freezer paper has a tendency to lift off the most tacky cutting mats once cuts are made.  Paper that lifts off the cutting mat can get caught and possibly damage your Silhouette machine.
  2. Place freezer paper on the cutting mat.  I recommend flattening your freezer paper if it came in a roll and ensuring the entire paper adheres to the cutting mat.  Rolled paper on an un-tacky mat will always lift from the cutting mat.
  3. Cut.  If you are using the latest Silhouette Ratchet-Style Blade, use a Material Type that calls for a blade setting of 2.  I selected ‘Heat Transfer Material – Smooth’.  Because my freezer paper was 15″ long, I cut the mustache and succulent on the top 6″, flipped the cutting mat upside down and cut the chanel and aviator sunglasses on the bottom 6″. Note that both designs were placed at the top 6″ of the mat.
  4. Place the onesie on an iron-safe surface.
  5. Place the cut stencil wax / shiny side down on the onesie.  If you want the design centered to the babies chest, draw an imaginary straight line from the armpits of the onesie using a ruler. Place the top of the design no more than 1″ over the ruler and center to the ruler.  If you have small pieces to iron, I recommend using tweezers and also placing the positive cut down as well. to keep the small negative pieces from shifting.
  6. Set your iron to the 2nd lowest setting with no steam.  On my Sunbeam iron, the setting is ‘Silk’.
  7. Remove the ruler and carefully iron until the was adheres to the onesie.  If you’re ironing to a synthetic fabric, be careful not to burn the shirt by ironing over the freezer paper only.  If the freezer paper is not adhering you can increase the heat setting on your iron but do so carefully.  If you’re ironing small negative pieces, using the edge of the iron, press down on the small piece.  If need be, also press down on the positive piece as it can be easily removed after ironed.
  8. If you placed the positive cut piece, now is the time to remove it.
  9. Place cardboard inside the onesie under the stencil area to prevent paint from seeping to the backside of the shirt.
  10. Paint!  I recommend painting from stencil into the middle of the design.  Painting from inside to the stencil runs the potential of ink bleeding under the stencil.
  11. Remove stencil.

Images:

chanel onesieaviator onesie mustache onesiesucculent onesie

Bridal Shower Invitation: Tea Party Part 1 – Plan

Instructions:

Unlike the invitations I made for previous events, the information that belonged on the invitation had to be gathered because my aunt took the lead on planning my cousin’s bridal shower with input from the mother of the groom and the Maid of Honor.

With so many people involved in various parts, I had to create a schedule with milestones and the responsible party to ensure a successful completion of the invitations.

I started with the following list:

Activity Due Date Assigned To
Provide Name & Contact information for person responsible for RSVPs 12 weeks before event Lead Planner
Provide Date & Time of Event 12 weeks before event Lead Planner
Provide RSVP Date 12 weeks before event Lead Planner
Provide Location & Address of Event 12 weeks before event Lead Planner
Provide Registry Information 12 weeks before event Lead Planner / Bride to be
Provide Attire Requirements 12 weeks before event Lead Planner
Identify Invitation Approvers 10 weeks before event Lead Planner
Finish Design First Draft 10 weeks before event Designer
Review and Comment 10 weeks before event Approvers
Provide Estimate Quantity of Invitations 10 weeks before event Lead Planner
Finish Final Design 10 weeks before event Designer
Purchase Paper and Envelopes 10 weeks before event Designer
Print Return Address 8 weeks before event Designer
Print Invitations 8 weeks before event Designer
Provide Final Mailing List 8 weeks before event Lead Planner
Print Recipient Name and Address 7 weeks before event Designer
Stuff Envelopes 6 weeks before event Designer
Mail Invitations 6 weeks before event Designer

The list then fed into my calendar to help me keep track of my overlapping commitment to three different events.

Here’s a peek at my calendar.

Bridal Shower Invitation: Tea Party

Idea:

My cousin doesn’t ask for much but when she does it is usually a brilliant idea that would only be our pleasure to help bring to fruition. She asked for a tea party bridal shower.  I’m not quite sure why but I proposed a secondary theme of vintage french linens to match.  So, off we go to design the invitations!

Inspiration:

Oh So Beautiful Paper curates gorgeous paper goods. Our version of a Tea Party Bridal Shower Invitation was inspired by two of their features. Joy’s Tea Bag Bridal Shower Invitations is featured on many paper good blogs and it’s obvious why. Our design is largely inspired by her creation for her cousin’s bridal shower with a slight french linen twist inspired by a Lucky Luxe wedding invitation.  Stay tuned for the next steps.

Images:

RUSTIC MARKET-INSPIRED FABRIC WEDDING INVITATIONS

Decorative Cardboard Letters: Baby Shower Decorations

Idea:
My friend Dina is expecting her first child and her Bridesmaids and I are showering her with love! We had four weeks to get the decorations ready and went minimal and chic to make it on time.

I love letters and fonts. I will take any chance I can to make them and now that I had the time, I took a stab at creating decorative cardboard letters. The challenge: finding the right size and font letters. Michael’s and JoAnn’s carry at least one set of wood or paper mache letters ready to decorate but never have they carried letters in a font, size and price that really appealed to me.

Inspiration:
Jennifer Jones photographed the most adorable Vintage Lamb Themed Baby Shower and the cardboard letters used in the shower is probably the best execution of yarn-wrapped cardboard letters I’ve seen.

Ingredients & Investment:

What I love about this project is that I already had all the materials I needed for this project except for the yarn.  Yarn is fairly inexpensive and I needed it for two other yarn-based decorations I planned for the baby shower anyway.

  • Corrugated Cardboard Boxes
  • Mod Podge
  • Tissue Paper
  • Font of preference
  • Printer
  • Printer Paper
  • Knife: I LOVE the OLFA Utility Knife my sister handed down to me.  She regularly used it for all types of materials during her FIT Interior Design undergraduate days.
  • Cutting Board: Another hand-me-down from my sister.  She gave me two different sizes of the Alvin cutting mat.  Both get used for almost every project.
  • Yarn
  • Time
    • Cut cardboard into 4 Letters: ~20 minutes each
    • Assemble letters: ~15 minutes each
    • Wrap letters in tissue paper: ~1 hr each
    • Wrap letters in yarn: ~1 hr each

Instructions:

I don’t believe in reinventing the wheel so I searched the web and curated the best instructions by Serendipity Child for making cardboard letters from scratch.

I made a few tweaks along the way:

  • I wanted to make sure all parts of the letters were no thinner than 1/2″ but also didn’t want a chunky font.  So I picked a serif font and used Silhouette Studio to offset the letters until I achieved the desired 8.5″ tall letter.
  • I don’t have an eye for proper proportioning so I printed the letters, taped the letter to the cardboard and cut using the printed “stencil”.  Because the letters, at a height of 8.5″ were wider than the 8.5″ paper, I printed the same letter on the same sheet twice.  One print captured the majority of the letter.  The second print captured the remainder of the letter.  Once I got the majority of the letter cut, I moved it over to trace the remainder.  It’s hard to explain but I have a photo below with an example of the letter “A”.
  • Serendipity Child used gummed tape, PVA glue and tissue paper to wrap her letters.  As I said before, because I was wrapping the letters in yarn, I skipped the gummed tape step (also because I didn’t want buy gummed tape because I didn’t have it on hand) and substituted PVA with Mod Podge to affix the tissue paper to the letters.
  • Yarn wrapping serif font isn’t easy.  It was mostly trial and error but I found Let Birds Fly’s advice to ‘wrap in the direction you would write them’ helpful.

Images:

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